网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台New England Today http:// New England's Magazine Thu, 04 Jun 网投平台大全 21:34:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 http:///wp-content/uploads/cropped-ne-512-32x32.png 网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台New England Today http:// 32 32 网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台New England Resilience | Classic Stories from the Yankee Archives http:///today/today/new-england-resilience-classic-stories-from-the-yankee-archives/ http:///today/today/new-england-resilience-classic-stories-from-the-yankee-archives/#respond Thu, 04 Jun 网投平台大全 21:34:27 +0000 http:///?p=166922 In Yankee’s July/August 网投平台大全 issue, we published a feature called “Resilience, Courage, and Hope,” which spotlighted some of our favorite profiles of New Englanders who overcame adversity. Due to space

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In Yankee’s July/August 网投平台大全 issue, we published a feature called “Resilience, Courage, and Hope,” which spotlighted some of our favorite profiles of New Englanders who overcame adversity. Due to space restrictions, we could include only excerpts in that feature — but here, we present links to many of the full versions (and we’ll add the rest over the coming weeks, when we can access our physical library again to digitize them). So read on for “the rest of the story,” and enjoy!

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GRACE CORRIGAN

READ THE STORY: “Christa McAuliffe’s Messenger” by Mel Allen, January/February 2011


STEPHEN KING

READ THE STORY: “The Man Who Writes Nightmares” by Mel Allen, March 1979


BILL DE LA ROSA

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READ THE STORY: “The Two Worlds of Bill De La Rosa” by Mel Allen, September/October 2016


WIL SMITH

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READ THE STORY: “Wil Smith’s Fast Break” by Mel Allen, December 2000


THE BACHELDER FAMILY

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Illustration by Ru_iStock

READ THE STORY: “Fire on the Farm” by Mel Allen, March/April 2007


BRENDAN LOUGHLIN

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Brendan Loughlin’s art bursts from the fences of Guilford, Connecticut.

John Madere

READ THE STORY: “Still Life” by Mel Allen, January 2008


SUSAN HAUGHWORT

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Wilmington, Vermont, Town Clerk Susan Haughwout, in the archive vault at the town offices.

Jonathan Gitelson

READ THE STORY: “Tropical Storm Irene Will Never Be Forgotten” by Ian Aldrich, July/August 2016


BARNEY ROBERG

READ THE STORY: “Barney Roberg’s Impossible Choice” by L. Michael McCartney, May 1980

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台Barney Roberg’s Impossible Choice | Yankee Classic http:///today/living/barney-robergs-impossible-choice-yankee-classic/ http:///today/living/barney-robergs-impossible-choice-yankee-classic/#respond Thu, 04 Jun 网投平台大全 18:55:57 +0000 http:///?p=166945 A true story of survival in the Maine woods by L. Michael McCartney.

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Originally published in Yankee, May 1980.

Thinking back on it, Barney said, it’s a good thing he stopped when he did that morning to repair the part of the old logging road that had been swamped out by the changing October weather. “Otherwise I wouldn’t be here to tell you about it today,” the former lumberman claims.

Bernard B. “Barney” Roberg, who now lives and works at the John Galanek Lumber 网投平台大全 in Southwick, Massachusetts, was telling a story that hasn’t been reported since 1956, but one that made him a folk hero among woodsmen from Bangor to the Canadian border. Ralph “Bud” Leavitt, executive sports editor for the Bangor Daily News, calls it “one of the greatest stories I’ve ever covered” in a career that has spanned more than three decades. Maine sportswriters were so impressed by Barney’s courage 23 years ago that they named him co-recipient of the “Sportsman of the Year” award along with world champion prizefighter Rocky Marciano. When sportscaster Mel Allen arrived to make the presentations, Leavitt recalls telling him,“You’re going to hear a story tonight like you’ve never heard before.”

Barney, now approaching age 65, calls himself the “black sheep son” of a Litchfield, Connecticut, educator and judge who wanted his oldest boy to become an engineer. “He sent me to MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology],” Barney reports, “but I just couldn’t stay there. I was always a restless sort and I couldn’t take all that sitting around in classrooms and libraries. All I ever really wanted was to be out in the woods. So I quit school at the end of my second year and went out and taught myself the lumber business.”

In the early autumn of 1956, he was working the woods outside of Portage Lake, Maine. He stayed with other loggers at Dean’s Motel in that town, but he generally worked off by himself, wandering alone into the deepest reaches of the forest, searching the edges of the woodland frontiers to probe the limits of the New England timber industry.

“This particular morning I left the motel in my four-wheel-drive jeep and headed up this deserted old logging road. Partway in, I ran into a quagmire of muck and water and sank down to my axels. I just about got through it. I thought for a minute I was going to have to winch myself out. But when I got clear of it I said to myself, “Well, Barney, you’d best stop right here and now and fix that little marsh because you sure aren’t going to feel like doing it on the way 网投平台大全 tonight, after a day’s work.”

So Barney cut some poles and saplings and threw them across the swamped-out road until he’d satisfied himself that he’d have enough traction to drive back through without trouble at day’s end. Then he continued on a distance of about five miles until he reached the end of the trail. He parked his jeep, took his ax and chain saw, and walked about another two miles deeper still.

Barney scanned nature’s offerings and decided to fell a pine tree that he guessed was better than two feet in diameter. As it began to topple, Barney realized that it was going to lodge itself in the branches of an equally tall tree in the path of its fall. He began to walk around behind the falling timber. Just as he was directly behind it, the tip of the falling tree slammed into the boughs of the other, bending it backward like a huge bowstring. The standing tree recoiled under the weight of the falling pine, but suddenly it thrust itself forward again and shot the trunk of the tree Barney had dropped backward off its stump like a gigantic bow firing a monstrous, blunt arrow.

The huge pine popped off its stump and flew directly backward, seizing Barney’s right leg in its flight. The backward thrust smashed the logger’s leg up against another pine, crushing skin, muscle, and bone and pinning Barney, trapped and seemingly helpless, against the dark wall of pine.

Barney recalls, “I nearly went into shock. I had to fight, at first, just to stay conscious. The pain was ferocious. It was sweeping over me in waves. I knew I had to stay conscious and I knew I had to get my wits about me. When I’d managed that, I took a look at my circumstances, and I can tell you they didn’t look promising. I tried to pull myself free, but that tree had me pinned in there so good there was no way I could yank myself out. Nobody knew exactly where I was, and I knew nobody’d even begin to miss me until nightfall, so it was pretty clear right from the start that I’d bleed to death if I just waited for help.”

His next thought, when it fought its way through the tides of pain and nausea that engulfed him, was to chop himself free. “I’d dropped my ax right next to me, so I reached down and picked it up and began whacking at the tree trunk. But you know, when you’re in an awful fix like that you’ve got more strength than you ever knew you had. On the third or fourth swing I busted that ax right off and the head went flying. I said to myself, ‘Well, you’ve really gone and done it now. You’ve just lost your best friend.’”

Barney rested and tried to develop another plan. The force of the blow from the tree had driven his chain saw right into the ground, partially burying the blade. “I knew if I could get hold of that saw I still had a chance,” barney said, “so I took what was left of the ax handle and, little by little, I dug of the chain saw, and inch by inch I nursed it over to where I could get my hand on it. I knew if I lost touch with that saw I was a goner for sure.”

Finally, sure of his grasp, Barney hoisted the saw up, rested on the trunk of the tree that had made him its prisoner, yanked the cord, and started the engine. The top of the fallen tree was still lodged in the upper branches of the one that had shot it backward into the logger’s leg. It had arced down at an angle of about 45 degrees from its tip to the butt end that held Barney captive against the other pine.

“Well, sir,” Barney remembered, “I thought for a minute that I had it made. I started to cut into the tree, but I’d had no more than started when I was disappointed again. The angle of that tree was such that as soon as I started cutting into it my saw started to bind up on me. I knew that if I went in any farther the pressure of the wood converging on the blade would bind the saw up so bad that I’d never be able to get it out. I couldn’t risk losing the saw. I was in a real pickle and I knew it. I just kept telling myself, ‘Barney, you can’t give up. If you give up you’re a dead man, no two ways about it.’ I had to stop and think a long time about what to do next.”

Even now, so many years later, Barney still paused before revealing his next move. He was sitting in the Houndshead Pub in Westfield, Massachusetts, sipping one of the two bottles of beer he permits himself after work each day. He was wearing the heavy woolen, red-and-black-checkered short common in lumber camps, and the shoulders were covered with sawdust, the epaulets of the lumberman. Pale blue eyes looked out of his brown leathery face with a distant expression.

“I finally decided there was just one thing for me to do,” he continued, “and I knew I had to do it. Thinking about it wasn’t getting me anywhere, and I was getting weaker all the time. So, I did it. I took the chain saw and cut my own leg off, just below the knee. I won’t go into the gory details. I just took the saw and cut off my own leg.”

He fell to the ground, removed the rawhide laces from his work boots and tied a tourniquet around the leg to stem the flow of blood. And there he sat. Having amputated his own leg he was still two miles over rugged terrain from his jeep and another five miles from that to the nearest source of help. “At first I thought of trying to make myself a pair of crutches,” Barney said, “and I fooled around with that project for a while. But there was no way I could do it. I head to head out of there fast because I was starting to fade in and out of consciousness. I decided I just had to crawl.”

The overland journey on his stomach, clawing along the pine needle floor of the forest, was continuously interrupted by horrendous pain and lapses into unconsciousness. “At that point I had only one thought,” Barney said. “I figured I was going to die out there, but when they found me I wanted them to know that I’d given it one hell of a fight. Every time I’d come to, I’d keep crawling again until I passed out, just saying to myself, ‘Barney, every yard you make it back toward that jeep you’ll have proved to them you didn’t quit. When they find you they’ll know you gave it all you had.”

It took him, as nearly as he can figure, four hours to cover the two miles, but at some point in the afternoon he made it back to the jeep. He was almost too weak and too awkward on the one remaining leg to drag himself up into the driver’s seat. When he finally managed that he faced another problem: He had to teach himself how to drive the jeep with only one leg. After a dozen agonizing attempts to operate accelerator, clutch, and brake with his left leg, he got the jeep turned around and headed back down the old logging road.

Only moments before he hit it, Barney remembered the marsh. “Oh, God!” he remembers imploring. “After all this don’t let me get stuck in that quagmire.”

He floored the accelerator. “The jeep hit the swamp like a tank,” he remembers. “It splashed and spun and twisted and it was throwing mud and saplings 30 feet in the air. Then it started to skid and bog down. I’d just about lost it. I figured right then and there I’d driven myself right into my own grave. And then, at the last possible second, the front tires grabbed onto firm ground and I got through. For the first time since I’d cut myself loose from that tree I began to think I was going to make it.”

When he arrived back at Dean’s Motel he called a woman over to the jeep to ask that she go inside and get him help. When she saw what had happened to his leg she was horrified. “She threw her hands over her face and began to scream,” Barney said with an understanding smile. “That was all I needed. I said, ‘Lady, whatever you do, please don’t do that.’”

John Galanek and his son came out of the motel, along with a doctor who was in the area because of an injury suffered by another logger that day. He told the Galaneks to rush Barney to the hospital in Eagle Lake, but first, he said, he would give him something for the pain.

“Make it a good one, Doc,” Barney said to him.

“I’m giving you enough to knock a horse flat,” the doctor promised.

“Just before I went under,” Barney recalls, “I said to myself, ‘It’s a good thing you aren’t a horse, old boy, or they’d be putting you to sleep for keeps.’”

When he next regained consciousness we was in an Eagle Lake hospital bed, confronted by an elderly physician who told him, “Fella, it ain’t too good. I’d sooner trust my money to a Democrat than bet on your chances of making it.”

“I made it this far,” Barney told him.

“Well,” the old doctor said, “the only chance you got, and it’s a slim one at that, is if I amputate the rest of this leg off up above the knee. Otherwise, sure’s cats have kittens, gangrene’s going to set in and that’ll be the end of you.”

“Listen here, Doc,” Barney answered. “I done all the cutting on that leg that’s going to be done. I got it trimmed up just the way I want it. You leave it alone.”

The old doctor shrugged. “Suit yourself,” he said, “but if I was in your place I don’t think I’d be so all-fired stubborn.”

Barney kept the knee and six weeks later walked out of the Eagle Lake hospital on crutches. The townspeople took a collection and paid off his medical costs. Two weeks later Barney was back at work driving a bulldozer and in a few months he went to Boston and was fitted with an artificial limb.

“Works good, too,” Barney said. “Watch this.”

He got off his bar stool and punted it 10 feet across the pub with the wooden leg to demonstrate its effectiveness.

Somebody offered to buy him a shot of whiskey. “God, no,” Barney protested. “I’m not ever supposed to be drinking this beer. Doctor’s orders, you know. I’m diabetic. The doctor says beer will kill me.”

The leathery face crinkled around the smiling blue eyes. “I guess I told him a thing or two about what can and can’t kill old Barney Roberg.”

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine http:///today/travel/maine/10-prettiest-coastal-towns-in-maine/ http:///today/travel/maine/10-prettiest-coastal-towns-in-maine/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///today/travel/maine/10-prettiest-coastal-towns-in-maine/ The Maine coast is 网投平台大全 to some of the most beautiful spots in America, including our list of the 10 prettiest coastal towns in Maine.

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Please note that businesses, attractions, and events throughout New England have been modified, closed, and/or canceled in response to the COVID-19 health crisis. Please travel responsibly, and check with state guidelines and individual businesses and organizations before making travel plans.


How can one stretch of coastline be 网投平台大全 to so many beautiful towns? Here, we celebrate ten of the prettiest coastal towns in Maine. All are especially beautiful in summer, but are well worth a visit any time of the year.

10 Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

网投平台大全10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Castine, Maine | 10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Courtesy of Cynthia Boyer

Castine

Leave Route 1’s hurly-burly behind to discover this historic little town at the mouth of the Penobscot River estuary. No wonder Castine has been drawing artists for 150 years—there’s even a 3-day plein air art festival in July. See more: From water level with daily summer tours.

LEARN MORE: Castine, Maine | A Historic Midcoast Maine Town

网投平台大全Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

Kennebunkport, Maine | Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

iStock.com/edella

Kennebunkport

The Kennebunk River adds even more waterline charm to the small shops, elegant ship captains’ 网投平台大全s, and fishing ports of this vibrant Southern Maine town of 3,474. We think it’s one of the most well-deserved Maine vacation spots around, especially when you factor in a visit to .

网投平台大全Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

Bar Harbor, Maine | Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

iStock.com/PictureLake

Bar Harbor

Some Maine destinations have to be experienced to be believed. Perched on Mount Desert Island at the gateway to via catamaran.

网投平台大全10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Boothbay Harbor, Maine | 10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Courtesy of Tom Burns

Boothbay Harbor

Surrounded by islands and lighthouses, Boothbay Harbor is a Mid Coast magnet for fishing, sailing and cruising. So much so, the town seems half-boats, half-buildings. Don’t miss a visit to the .

LEARN MORE: Things to Do in Boothbay Harbor, Maine

网投平台大全Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Damariscotta, Maine | 10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

iStock.com/AnkNet

Damariscotta

An all-American small town with shipbuilding roots, Damariscotta sits colorfully on the tidal Damariscotta River and hums with shops, restaurants, a community theatre and the state’s first Reny’s Department Store. See more: From the river, aboard the bright-red River Tripper at .

网投平台大全10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Stonington, Maine | 10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Courtesy of Henry Teverow

Stonington

One of Maine’s proudest and highest-producing lobstering harbors with more than 300 boats, this Down East town perched on spectacular, granite Deer Isle, shares its beauty with tourists but retains a solid, 网投平台大全town feel. See more: Take the for a true Down East experience.

网投平台大全Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

Camden, Maine | Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

Mark Fleming

Camden

The self-dubbed “Jewel of the Coast” is a well-deserved moniker, and this Mid-Coast harbor town of 4,823 on Penobscot Bay is tucked where mountains reach down to the sea. It’s one of our favorite places to visit in Maine in winter, too, thanks to its many wonderful .

LEARN MORE: Rockport & Camden | Two Miles of Coastal Beauty

网投平台大全Win the Blue Hill Inn | Blue Hill, Maine

Blue Hill, Maine | 10 Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine

Aimee Seavey

Blue Hill

A warm and cozy Down East community that retains the splendid historical architecture of its 18th-century shipbuilding roots, Blue Hill’s harbor is a watery gateway to Acadia National Park. See more: From above, hiking .

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Rockport Harbor, Maine | 10 Prettiest Coastal Towns In Maine

Benggriff via Wikimedia Commons

Rockport

The harbor of this tiny coastal town is considered the most picturesque one in Maine… and that is high praise indeed. Further, it’s bounded by a lovely verdant park, complete with a resident seal (in marble). We’re talking about .

LEARN MORE: Rockport, Maine | A Charming, Historic Harbor Town

网投平台大全Machias Seal Island

An Atlantic Puffin on Machias Seal Island, off the coast of Maine.

iStock.com/HarryCollins

Cutler

Pure, Down East, and unspoiled. No gift shops, no tourist traps. Here, there’s a daily view of lobster boats in the small harbor, with Canada’s Grand Manan Island in the distance. A nearby colony of puffins and a (where you can spend the night) make this tiny, far-flung town a true beauty. Few coastal Maine towns can deliver such an authentic experience. See more: Check out those puffins with .

Do you love the Maine coast as much as we do? What are your picks for the prettiest coastal towns in Maine? Towns with the best beaches in Maine? The best lobster rolls in Maine? Let us know!

This post was first published in 2015 and has been updated. 

SEE MORE:
10 Prettiest Coastal Towns in New England
25 Best Beach Towns in New England
10 Best Seaside Inns in New England

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台Vermont Cheddar-Ale Dip http:///today/food/appetizers/dips-spreads/vermont-cheddar-ale-dip/ http:///today/food/appetizers/dips-spreads/vermont-cheddar-ale-dip/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///?p=133013 This recipe for cheddar-ale dip combines some of our favorite classic Vermont flavors. The darker brew you choose, the stronger (and more delicious) the flavor will be.

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台How to Make 网投平台大全made Hummingbird Food http:///today/living/how-to-make-网投平台大全made-hummingbird-food/ http:///today/living/how-to-make-网投平台大全made-hummingbird-food/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///?p=154307 Hummingbirds are favorite summer garden visitors, and this easy 网投平台大全made hummingbird food recipe will keep them coming to your feeder all season long.

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We recently moved from the city to the country, and one of my favorite things about our new 网投平台大全 is the yard. Some yard discoveries (like the ticks) I could really do without, but others (like the butterfly-magnet milkweed growing along the driveway) have been a delight. Hoping to add hummingbirds to our list of animal visitors, I recently picked up a hummingbird feeder from our local hardware store and set about learning how to make 网投平台大全made hummingbird food to fill it.

网投平台大全网投平台大全made Hummingbird Food Recipe

网投平台大全made hummingbird food is easy to make, and hummingbird-approved.

Aimee Tucker

A few notes about hummingbirds and hummingbird food.

When can you see hummingbirds in New England?

Hummingbirds, like the ruby-throated hummingbird commonly seen in New England, typically arrive in late April or early May and migrate to Mexico and Central America in the early autumn. You can learn more about New England hummingbird species .

Why are hummingbird feeders red?

Hummingbirds are especially drawn to brightly colored flowers, which is why most hummingbird feeders and containers of store-bought nectar are red. If you really want to attract hummingbirds, you can add plants that attract hummingbirds to your yard or garden in addition to hanging a feeder.

How often do hummingbirds eat?

Hummingbirds consume approximately half their weight in sugar every day, meaning the average bird feeds five to eight times per hour — so keep that feeder full! They also eat small insects (but not ticks, unfortunately).

How to Make 网投平台大全made Hummingbird Food

网投平台大全made hummingbird nectar is so easy to make there’s really no reason to buy it, and by making your own, you can be sure it’s safe for the birds to eat. Remember to change the nectar and clean your feeder regularly.

网投平台大全made Hummingbird Food Ingredients

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 cups water

In a medium saucepan, whisk together the sugar and water and bring it to a boil. Boil for three minutes, then remove from heat and allow to cool. Fill your feeder, and enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to two weeks. Yields 4 cups.

After filling and hanging our feeder, we watched and waited, and before long, we had our first visitor. A female ruby-throated hummingbird zipped over, sipped from the feeder, and was gone before I could even reach for my camera. With any luck, before the summer is over I’ll be able to get a few good photos. In the meantime, though, I’m happy to watch her come and go while I wash the dishes.

Do you look forward to seeing hummingbirds every year? Have you ever made 网投平台大全made hummingbird food? Let us know!

This post was first published in 2019 and has been updated. 

SEE MORE:
Plants That Attract Hummingbirds to the Garden
Plants That Repel Insects and Garden Pests
The Best Places to Watch Wildlife in New England

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台Best Sour Cream Coffee Cake Recipe http:///today/food/breakfast-brunch/coffee-cakes/best-sour-cream-coffee-cake/ http:///today/food/breakfast-brunch/coffee-cakes/best-sour-cream-coffee-cake/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///today/food/breakfast-brunch/coffee-cakes/best-sour-cream-coffee-cake/ This recipe for the best sour cream coffee cake is a keeper. Our readers love the delightfully moist cake covered in a sweet cinnamon-sugar topping.

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台Hosta Plants | Planting, Care, and Pest Advice http:///today/living/gardening/hosta-plants/ http:///today/living/gardening/hosta-plants/#respond Wed, 03 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///today/living/gardening/hosta-plants/ Hosta plants have been a favorite of New England gardeners for centuries. Here's how to plant and care for these hardy, shade-loving plants.

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Hosta plants have been a favorite foliage plant in New England gardens since the early 1800s. Originally from the Orient, they were first brought to Europe in the late 1700s, making their way to America by the early 1800s. Today there are over 2,000 varieties of the hosta plants to choose from.  There are also many hosta garden clubs and societies dedicated to growing,  educating, sharing, and preserving these garden favorites.

网投平台大全Hosta Plants | Planting, Care, and Pest Advice

Hosta Plants | Planting, Care, and Pest Advice

Pixabay

Hosta plants are bulky, leafy, low-growing perennials that come in a range of green hues from deep blue-green to very light colors that are almost milky white in appearance.  There’s also a variety of variegated hostas.  Regardless of color, all hosta plants sprout a shoot from which delicate flowers resembling tiny elongated bells in white, pink, or lavender emerge. The shoots and  flowers appear in mid to late summer.

How to Plant Hostas

Hosta plants should be divided and planted in the early spring or in the late fall before the first frost. Plant in an area with good drainage in hole with a depth of about  12 inches. Fill the area around the hosta with rich soil.  Adequate room (about 8-10 inches for a small hosta plant) should be left at the perimeter of the plant to allow for growth as the plant matures. Hostas reach full maturity after about 6 years.

While hostas are known for being a shade-loving plant, there are some varieties that do best with a bit of sunlight exposure. A good rule of thumb to allow variegated or lighter-colored hostas more access to sunlight. The deeper, darker plants require moderate shade. All hosta’s need some shade (at least 3 hours per day) and should never be planted in direct sunlight.

Troubleshooting Hosta Pests

Most hosta plants are not susceptible to disease and are quite forgiving and hardy, although they are a favorite snack of deer and slugs. If deer start nibbling on your hostas, follow my tips to keep deer out of the garden. To keep slugs away from your hostas, sprinkle wood, ash,  sand, or crushed eggshells around the soil at the base of the plant. Be sure that you do not saturate the area with wood ash. Another trick to deter slugs is to place a bottle of beer that is ½ full on the side near the plants. The slugs will be attracted to the beer and drown when they enter the bottle.

Once established, hostas are virtually maintenance free, hardy and fast growing. These plants will spread and multiply and may be divided for sharing after a few years of growth.

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台The Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England http:///today/travel/new-england/things-to-do/the-most-beautiful-cemeteries-in-new-england/ http:///today/travel/new-england/things-to-do/the-most-beautiful-cemeteries-in-new-england/#comments Wed, 03 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///today/travel/new-england/things-to-do/the-most-beautiful-cemeteries-in-new-england/ Dating back to the 19th-century, these garden-style cemeteries are considered some of the most beautiful cemeteries in New England.

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Please note that businesses, attractions, and events throughout New England have been modified, closed, and/or canceled in response to the COVID-19 health crisis. Please travel responsibly, and check with state guidelines and individual businesses and organizations before making travel plans.


Are you a Tombstone Tourist? Do you enjoy visiting cemeteries as a destination for art, history, nature, and serenity? If so, you’re in luck. New England is 网投平台大全 to several historic “garden-style” or “rural” cemeteries, a landscape style made popular throughout the 19th-century by combining “final resting place” with a “place of natural beauty,” making them a popular destination for both the living and the recently living. Stroll one of these historic, garden-style cemeteries today and see why we’ve named them the most beautiful cemeteries in New England.

The Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England | Garden-Style

网投平台大全Mount Auburn Cemetery | Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England

Mount Auburn Cemetery | Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England

John Phelman/Wikimedia Commons

| Cambridge, MA

Founded in 1831, Mount Auburn is often cited as not just one of the most beautiful cemeteries in New England, but also in the world. It was the first of the 19th-century “rural cemetery” movement that combined cemeteries with park-style landscaping. Walking paths wind between more than 5,000 trees and more than 30,000 monuments, including top displays from early American sculptors. Famous “residents” include artist Winslow 网投平台大全r, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and cookbook author Fannie Farmer, though in total over 90,000 people are buried at Mt. Auburn today. Guided tours of the cemetery’s historic, artistic, and horticultural points of interest are available, and well worth it.

If you like Mount Auburn Cemetery you may also wish to visit in nearby Jamaica Plain, founded in the same garden style in 1848.

Take a break and read about all of your favorite locations that made the Best of New England Hall of Fame.

| Bangor, ME

Founded in 1834, Mount Hope Cemetery in the up-and-coming town of Bangor was likely modeled after Mount Auburn Cemetery’s “garden” style. Its prestige and beauty made it a natural attractive resting place for Maine’s political elite — includes the gravesites of a Vice President, two Senators, eleven Congressmen, two U.S. Ambassadors, five Governors of Maine, eight Civil War Generals, and numerous other prominent Maine businessmen and residents. Whew!

网投平台大全most beautiful cemeteries in New England

Swan Point Cemetery | Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England

Aimee Tucker

| Providence, RI

Founded in 1846, Swan Point Cemetery’s original 60 acres (now 200) of meticulously maintained grounds, trees, and walking paths have long been a serene sanctuary for many Ocean State residents. Dozens of Rhode Island political and military figures are buried today at Swan Point, including Civil War General Ambrose Burnside and Major Sullivan Ballou, a Smithfield native who died following the First Battle of Bull Run in the summer of 1861. The heartfelt letter he penned to his wife, Sarah, in the days leading up to the battle, expressing an honest meditation on patriotism and death, was memorably featured in Ken Burns’s award-winning 1990 documentary The Civil War.

LEARN MORE! Swan Point Cemetery | Local Treasure

网投平台大全Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England

Cedar Hill Cemetery | Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England

Teri Demaille

| Hartford, CT

Founded in 1866, Cedar Hill was designed to serve as a “rural cemetery” in the style of Mount Auburn Cemetery, with mature trees, walking paths, and gravestones doubling as art. It spreads over three tows (Hartford, Wethersfield, and Newington) spanning 273 acres, including the Northam Memorial Chapel and Gallup Memorial Gateway. Group or self-guided tours available.

网投平台大全most beautiful cemeteries in New England

Hope Cemetery | Most Beautiful Cemeteries in New England

| Barre, VT

When the “granite capital of the world” town of Barre, Vermont founded Hope Cemetery in 1895, it was understood that its stones would be something special. Serving as both cemetery and unofficial art gallery, its original 53 (today 65) acres display masterful carvings by many of the world’s top granite sculptors. In fact, a large number of the tombstones mark the graves of the sculptors themselves, and were sometimes even carved by the very artist that now lies beneath it.

Are these the most beautiful cemeteries in New England? Let us know!

This post was first published in 2014 and has been updated. 

SEE MORE:
Most Haunted Hotels in New England
Halloween in Salem, Massachusetts
Sleepy Hollow Cemetery | Where Concord’s Legends Lie
America’s Oldest Cemetery | Miles Standish Cemetery

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台Great New England Road Trip Food http:///today/travel/new-england/new-england-road-trip-food/ http:///today/travel/new-england/new-england-road-trip-food/#comments Wed, 03 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///?p=136339 From fried clams to grilled cheese, our food editor maps out some of the best places in New England for road trip food — conveniently right off the interstate.

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Please note that businesses throughout New England have been closed or have modified hours and/or services in response to the COVID-19 health crisis. Please travel responsibly, and check with individual businesses before making travel plans.


Knowing how easy it is to work up an appetite on long drives, Yankee food editor Amy Traverso recently compiled a list of favorite places to eat near New England’s interstates. Beyond serving up great road trip food, the winners also had to meet these criteria: (1) A location outside major cities and their parking hassles. (2) Operating hours that span at least two meals. (3) Menu with something for kids. (4) Setting casual enough for travel clothes.

网投平台大全Great Eats off the Interstate | New England Road Trip Food

2018 Editors’ Picks for Food Lovers | Tastiest Refueling Spots Off the Interstate

Matthew Billington

Great New England Road Trip Food

| Oakland, Maine

Expect killer pies and great lobster rolls at this beloved gourmet grocery and café.

| Lincoln, NH

This cute-as-a-button spot makes superb banana bread French toast and a road trip–worthy Reuben.

| Middlesex, VT

Some of the best breads in New England are baked here. Don’t miss the egg sandwiches and tartines.

| Norwich, VT

From bread, jam, and porridge to a perfect grilled cheese, this café has day-trippers covered.

| West Lebanon, NH

There’s a 1952 Worcester diner car hidden in this non-descript building, and its eggs Benedict and poutine are terrific.

| Kittery, ME

While the menu is vast, it’s really all about the fried clams (ask for them “Bob’s style”).

| Manchester, NH

They claim to have invented chicken tenders, so you have to try them — either straight up or baked parmigiana-style.

| Bernardston, MA

Several restaurants inside Kringle Candle serve brunch through dinner (hit the more casual Tavern for excellent flatbreads).

| Sturbridge, MA

The bread basket, with its cornbread and sticky buns, is the stuff of legend. So is the classic turkey dinner.

| Pawtucket, RI

You can’t miss with any of the many daily specials here, but we love the chouriço special and yummy custard French toast.

| Vernon, CT

Of course the main route between NYC and Boston has a terrific deli. Love the matzo ball soup and corned beef.

| Woodbury, CT

The doughnuts here are so beloved, their recipes are held like state secrets. Same with the plump, buttery chicken pies.

| Meriden, CT

This is the best place to try Connecticut’s signature steamed cheeseburgers, full stop.

| Madison, CT

Come for fried fish and hot butter lobster rolls, then — if you time it right — catch a beach sunset at Hammonasset State Park.

Where are your favorite spots in New England to get road trip food?

These “Editors’ Picks for Food Lovers” originally appeared in the May/June 2018 issue of Yankee

SEE MORE:
Best of New England | 2018 Editors’ Choice Awards
10 Best Summer Road Trips in New England
Best Fall Road Trips in New England

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网投平台大全|网投彩|网投平台|cc网投平台Easiest Roses to Grow in New England http:///today/living/gardening/easy-roses-to-plant/ http:///today/living/gardening/easy-roses-to-plant/#comments Tue, 02 Jun 网投平台大全 10:00:00 +0000 http:///today/living/gardening/easy-roses-to-plant/ Learn about the easiest types of roses to grow in New England, all of which are hardy enough to survive — and even thrive — in our harsh climate.

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Growing roses in New England can be tricky due to the often unpredictable weather that this region is known for. Roses that are strong and planted properly, however, can be surprisingly low maintenance once they are established. Here are the three easiest types of roses to grow in New England, all of which are hardy enough to survive — and even thrive — in our sometimes harsh climate. You’ll also find simple instructions for getting these New England roses to grow into healthy bushes that provide years of enjoyment.

网投平台大全Easiest Roses to Grow

Rosa Rugosas thrive in New England’s unpredictable climate.

Brenda Darroch

Easiest Roses to Grow in New England

Beach Roses (Rosa rugosa)

Beach roses are fast-growing bushes that spread quickly and are covered with continually blooming pink or white flowers. They thrive in almost all soil types — from sandy beaches to roadside fences. Once planted, beach roses require very little attention, making them one of the easiest types of roses to grow anywhere.

Climbing Roses

A trellis hanging heavy with fragrant roses is a breathtaking and romantic sight, and one that has been seen in New England gardens for centuries. There are dozens of climbing roses to choose from. Consult your local nursery for available options.

Tea Roses

Originally hybrids from China网投平台大全, these roses have evolved and have been successfully cultivated in northeastern gardens for many years, though they may require wood-framed protection in the winter. They are larger than most climbing roses and are very fragrant. Traditionally found in shades of pink and yellow, they are also available in white and red.

Take a break and read about all of your favorite locations that made the Best of New England Hall of Fame.

Guide to Planting Roses

Supplies for Planting Roses

  • Shovel
  • Bucket
  • Hose or watering can
  • Spade
  • Rose bush
  • Bone meal
  • Aged cow manure
  • Peat
  • Potting soil
  • Mulch

Soil Recipe

Mix together equal amounts (approximately 1/2 cup of each for a medium to large size bush — less for smaller plants) of peat, composted cow manure, bone meal, and potting soil.

网投平台大全Easiest Roses to Grow

A trellis hanging heavy with fragrant roses is a breathtaking and romantic sight.

Shelley Wigglesworth

Instructions for Planting Roses

  1. Prepare ahead of time a mixture of equal parts peat, composted cow manure, bone meal, and potting soil. (See above recipe.)
  2. Choose a sunny location and dig a hole that is double the width and depth of the root ball.
  3. Gently remove the rose plant from the container and loosen the root ball.
  4. Place the rose plant in the hole so that the entire root ball is evenly standing underground. The top of the root ball should be flush to the top of the ground.
  5. Sprinkle the mixture of bone meal, soil, manure, and peat into the hole around the shrub and fill the remaining space with clean, rich soil. Cover the top of the root ball with approximately 2 inches of soil, being careful to ensure that the stem or stalk of the plant is not covered with dirt.
  6. Spread a few inches of mulch around the plant and water thoroughly every few days.
  7. To increase and encourage new rose bud growth, snip off weak, faded, and past-peak blooms as they appear.
  8. In the fall, be sure to mulch deeply. Alternatively, wrap fragile shrubs in burlap or cover with a wooden pitched box to protect them from heavy snow and ice — unless, of course, they are beach roses; these bushes are hardy and can survive just about anything.

If you’re looking for types of roses that will thrive in your zone, you can’t go wrong with these three easy roses. Let us know in the comments what your favorite roses to grow in New England are!

This post was first published in 2013 and has been updated. 

SEE MORE:
Foolproof Roses | Winter-Hardy Varieties
Roses | Advice from Gardener Suzy Verrier
A Rose Glossary

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